Monthly Archives: May 2009

Stickleblog: While we’re on the subject of angling…

Most stickleback researchers catch their fish in two ways: setting minnow traps and seining. For a third (and rather creative) way, you’ll want to check out this clip from a British fishing show:

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Catch Peter on National Geographic TV tonight!

If you’re quick you might be able to catch Peter on National Geographic TV tonight on the show “Hooked On Fish”. It’s a great show, using stories of anglers catching huge fish as a jumping-off point to talk about some … Continue reading

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Stickleblog: Caught in the act

This week, I’m going to discuss a cool paper that came out of Dolph Schluter’s lab in 2008. The paper zooms in on a particularly interesting part of stickleback evolution, the transition between an ancestral marine form that breeds in … Continue reading

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Stickleblog: Sticklebacks (in) rock

There are millions of sticklebacks across the globe, but you can also find sticklebacks in fossil form. The scientific name for most fossil sticklebacks is Gasterosteus doryssus, but morphologically this fossil “species” belongs within the threespine stickleback complex. One Miocene … Continue reading

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Stickleblog: The stickleback family tree, part 2

Some weeks ago, I discussed a large phylogenetic study that separated sticklebacks from the seahorses and pipefishes – today I’m going to discuss a phylogenetics paper that zooms in on the relationships between different sticklebacks(and their very closest relatives). Many … Continue reading

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Stickleblog: Sticklebacks at work

Today’s Stickleblog deals with a recent paper in the journal Nature by Luke Harmon(a contributor on the blog Dechronization – check it out!), Dolph Schluter, and a number of other folks. The paper features the threespine stickleback species pairs, which … Continue reading

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